Monday, October 9, 2017

Spain and England feared that enslaved Africans would be more susceptible to revolt if they were Muslim

Muslims were banned from the Americas as early as the 16th century
by Andrew Lawler

"By the time of the Hispaniola revolt, Spanish authorities had already forbidden travel by any infidel, whether Muslim, Jewish, or Protestant, to its New World colonies, which at the time included the land that is now the United States... In 1682, the Virginia colony went a step further, ordering that all “Negroes, Moors, mulattoes or Indians who and whose parentage and native countries are not Christian” automatically be deemed slaves."

"Of course, suppressing “Islamic leanings” did little to halt slave insurrections in either Spanish or British America. Escaped slaves in Panama in the 16th century founded their own communities and fought a long guerilla war against Spain. The Haitian slave revolt at the turn of the 19th century was instigated by and for Christianized Africans, although whites depicted those seeking their freedom as irreligious savages. Nat Turner’s rebellion in Virginia in 1831 stemmed in part from his visions of Christ granting him authority to battle evil."

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/muslims-were-banned-americas-early-16th-century-180962059/#YTQlVmHviYtslYZg.99

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